😬 Hi, I'm Rith!
(Panharith Ean)

currently@ Bluecadet,
previously@ Harvard, OMA, Studio Z, KhĂ´ra

Say hi!

(something like this,
in a nine-square grid)



Rith. Projects. About.


  Surface   Planar Quadrilateral (PQ) Mesh researches double curvature surfaces (non-zero Gaussian), to transform them into developable surfaces through the panelization technique. Panelization takes on different control parameters: density, size, height of the panels, allowing for customization bespoke to the output medium. The application of the research aims to resolve complex geometry for fabrication at different scales and mediums from wearables to architecture.







Planar Quadrilateral (PQ) Mesh researches double curvature surfaces (non-zero Gaussian), to transform them into developable surfaces through the panelization technique. Panelization takes on different control parameters: density, size, height of the panels, allowing for customization bespoke to the output medium. The application of the research aims to resolve complex geometry for fabrication at different scales and mediums from wearables to architecture.






Prototyping I: Intersected Object The initial study begins with the intersection object between two geometries: a hyperboloid of revolution and a tori. The panelization system subdivides the surface of this new object into planar quadrilateral (PQ) Mesh. The goal is to resolve the intersection between the panelized patches as consistently and elegantly as possible, using triangle panels on the edge to resolve the disparities between iso-curves extracted from the two patches.








Prototyping with paper model






Unrolled 3D geometry into a continuous wearable surface






Prototyping II: Topography Design in collaboration with Gia Jung

How do we fabricate a mountain? Inspired by the curvature of a mountain range and its elegant topography, we use the secant-plane panelization method to subdivide the mountain surface into an array of non-porous shingles. This method creates 3-dimensional panels across the double curvature surface, creating a new developable topography.





Step 1: Panelize the double curvature panels, and then create a set of points on each corner of the subdivide panel, having a plane passing through three of the points.
Step 2: Shift in the heigh of the remaining point of the panel.
Step 3: Add triangular edge pieces to the panel to connect all the surfaces. This process is applied to all subdivide surfaces of the topography with control perimeters to create the desired outcome.

















Prototyping III: Wearable Combining the two previous systems, this prototype studies the curvatures of the human face to create a mask by panelization and extrusion. After subdividing the desired region on the face for a mask, the subdivide panel is extruded into a cone with varying heights.





Physical prototype



AR version of the mask




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